homeschool homeschool
home schooling
homeschool home schooling homeschool home schooling homeschool home schooling
homeschooling homeschooling
homeschooling
homeschooling
homeschooling
homeschooling
homeschooling
homeschooling
homeschooling
homeschooling
homeschooling
homeschooling
homeschooling
homeschooling
homeschooling

Click on a title for reviews in that area, or on "REVIEWS" to return to the main reviews page.

homeschooling homeschooling
Homeschooling Reviews
  A Family Program for Reading Aloud
A Record of the Learning Lifestyle
Beautiful Girlhood
Educating the Wholehearted Child
Endangered Minds
Help! I'm Married to a Homeschool Mom
Homeschooling: The Right Choice
Homeschooling the Teen Years
Let Us Highly Resolve: Preparing Families to Enter the 21st Century
Mysterious Ways (DVD)
Starting Points
Teaching the Trivium – Christian Homeschooling in a Classical Style
You Can Teach Your Child Successfully (and 3 other books)

A Family Program for Reading Aloud
by Rosalie June Slater
A review by Karen Andreola

A Family Program for Reading Aloud
A Family Program for Reading Aloud, Second Edition
Rosalie June Slater / F.a.c.e. / 1991
Too often (well-meaning, self-sacrificing) teachers do a gallon of teaching for an ounce of learning. Why? Kept on a strict diet of uninspiring teachers’ lectures, textbooks and workbooks, tedium sets in. Minds close. I am happy to tell you that there is a remedy. Real books and narration bring better results. Minds open. I’ve received countless letters over the years bearing witness of this observable fact. How does it work? 1.The real books themselves are the teachers. 2. Attentive interest is magnified by the use of inspiring literature. 3. Children retain far more when they tell back in their own words what was read. This reformation in education will turn your school around.
A Family Program for Reading Aloud
encourages such large learning. It promotes what the author calls “reflective learning.” (We read, we narrate, and then we know.) It is an excellent resource for the new home teacher, or any mom wishing to make greater use of real books. Not merely a book list, you will be introduced to authors who advocate living by godly principles. You will gain a better understanding of what makes a good book good. With an emphasis on American history and Christian character development, based on the “principle approach,” its pages have a patriotic feel.
- Karen

Preschool to high school.
Foundation for American Christian Education
120 pages

A Record of the Learning Lifestyle
by Charlene Notgrass
A review by Karen Andreola

A Record of the Learning Lifestyle
A Record of the Learning Lifestyle
Charlene Notgrass / Notgrass Company
One of the constant tasks of a homemaker/home teacher is to make order out of what (if left to itself) would be chaos. Those reading this know exactly what I mean down to the last detail. With a little planning, however, daily lessons and a marathon of meals, run more smoothly and steadily. I like the writing spaces of this record-keeping book (or planner). The carefully worded subtitles cover the school subjects in flexible way. Jot your activities in these boxes and this will show you how well you are accomplishing your goal to create a well-rounded lifestyle of learning. You'll have to plan your meals elsewhere but on second thought . . . you could jot a simple dish in the box marked "Learning to Work: Chores, Service, and Life Skills" and guide your children in doing a little of the cooking. Other boxes help you focus on character building along with academic knowledge and skills. A two-page spread provides a-week-at-a-glance, leaving a margin for the child fill in "What I Did This Week." Each week greets you with a new decorative photo and a verse of Scripture. Although the covers are "cute" we are using one for high school. --Karen

Beautiful Girlhood
A review by Karen Andreola

Beautiful Girlhood
Beautiful Girlhood
Karen Andreola / Great Expectations Co / 1993

There is a word of yesteryear seldom heard today. It is the word that represents what I desire my daughters to become. The word is “lady-like.” Reading Beautiful Girlhood brings back the charm and sentiment associated with this word. So when I found Beautiful Girlhood I was very happy. It was an old-fashioned book that held to the ideals I believed in and only needed a little revision. Firstly, I read and contemplated its pages for my own edification. Among such topics as building character, strength in obedience, making friends with books, a sunny disposition, modest dress, a pure heart and a consecrated life, are ideals any grown woman will find both convicting and comforting. When each daughter eventually approached the age of twelve I read its short chapters of gentle instruction aloud to her. It was our special time alone together. Later it was referred to by them in their silent reading.
   Beautiful and noble possibilities are present in every girl for becoming a godly woman, for becoming lady-like. Encouragement and counsel await those who read Beautiful Girlhood. For the girl who reads this book, may your blossoming into womanhood, your example of sincerity, purity, and love, be a source of happiness for yourself and a star of hope to other girls.
- Karen


Educating the Wholehearted Child
by Sally and Clay Clarkson
A review by Karen Andreola

Educating the WholeHearted Child
Educating the Whole Hearted Child
Clay Clarkson / Faithworks Publications / 1996
When it comes to home education this handbook puts bold emphasis on the “home” part of the phrase. The authors Sally and Clay help us see what education looks like outside of our classroom-first-impressions of it. Their testimony of the advantages of being educated “at home” are numerous and so very inviting that the reader cannot wait to put into practice one of the many helpful suggestions that has appealed to her. The advice to rely more on real books and less on textbooks stems from my heroine Charlotte Mason and her extraordinary approach to teaching. And I am happy to say that the reader will find many tips on how to incorporate real books, narration, and real life into a child’s education. I agree with Sally and Clay that by following the Biblical pattern of family as the center of a child’s life we will not only have well-educated children but wholehearted ones indeed.

Endangered Minds
by Jane Healy, PH.D
A review by Karen Andreola

Endangered Minds
Endangered Minds
Jane Healy / Simon & Schuster Trade Sales / 1999
Phew, was I glad to be homeschooling when I read this (secular ) book! Dr. Healy gives extensive documentation of the effects of our hurried lifestyle and intrusive media (beginning with Sesame Street) on masses of children.
Children have become harder to teach. Learning disorders prevail. However, Dr. Healy says that intelligence is not the issue: it is the new “habits of mind” that have hindered the development of children’s brains. Children’s brains are actually shaped by their experiences. Today’s children experience little meaningful conversation at home, watch television for hours daily, stare at the computer screen, and are bombarded with the continuous loud beat of droning music. Consequently, there is far less opportunity for language development and its important brain shaping. Also, there is almost no time for imaginative play, reading and peaceful reflection - sources of further brain shaping.
It was interesting to discover that the advice given to readers in Endangered Minds was similar to that proclaimed by Charlotte Mason one hundred years ago. Both Miss Mason and Dr. Healy believe that giving children the gift of language is not a trivial thing. When a mother is at home talking with her little children, reading to them, setting the table for supper with them, examining a flower or an insect, she is helping them to follow a train of thought, and requiring their minds to be attentive. She is helping to shape (develop) their brains. And this, my fellow stay-at-home-mother, is very, very valuable, remarkably valuable.
Happily, homeschooling not only gives us the freedom to take hold of this advice for building mental powers but it enables us the quantity of unhurried time we need to build a spiritual relationship with our children as well.

Help! I'm Married to a Homeschool Mom
by Todd Wilson
A review by Dean Andreola

Help! I'm Married to a Homeschooling MOM
Help! I'm Married to a Homeschooling MOM
Todd Wilson / Moody Publishers
"It was late. One dim light in the house was still on. I was almost asleep when. . .
"HAA!!"
"What's that? Is there a fire?" I said quickly sitting up in bed.
"Oops, sorry. This funny book came today," Karen apologized, showing me the cover.
"Help! I'm Married to a Homeschool Mom, I read, "But that's for ME to read."
"Yes I know...but listen to this." and off she went to read one funny but pointedly true passage after another. It was nice to know that there are other families out there going through the same joys and trials that we face every day. Todd Wilson has a knack for telling funny stories about our homeschool experience. He sympathizes with us dads. But even better, he is able to use his gentle humor to open the eyes and hearts of us often distracted husbands, so we can better understand and meet the needs of our hard working wives! Some topics are: Encouragement, Leadership, Listening, Money, Muscle, Time, Understanding, Approval, Prayer, Sacrifice, in only 85 pages! And if Dad won't read it, bait him with the great cartoons in each chapter, or better yet...read it out loud, at night, while he is trying to sleep." - Dean

Homeschooling: The Right Choice
by Chris Klicka
A review by Dean Andreola

homeschooling
Home Schooling: The Right Choice
Christopher Klicka / Broadman / Holman / 2001
Some of you are probably saying, “ I’m already homeschooling, I’ve made the right choice, I don’t think I need to read this one”…. Well, that’s what I thought. At least until I heard Chris speak at a recent state homeschool conference. The message in his book needs to be read by every Christian parent who is concerned about freedom, their rights as American citizens, and the future of their children. Even if you currently homeschool the subjects covered in this book will keep you better informed of your rights, tell you how to get involved with the local and national politics of education, and teach you how to handle unwelcome intrusions from social workers and school officials. But that’s not all. Chris clearly explains the major problems with public school. This section is a real eye opener! It offers a wealth of facts you won’t find in your local newspaper. Facts your non-homeschooling friends and family, need to hear. Chris also lays the biblical foundations for home based education, and tells many homeschool success stories. If you have been second-guessing your decision to homeschool, considering homeschooling for the first time, or a dad feeling a little left out of the process, this book will help you regain your focus, and renew your resolve to take control of your children’s education.
-Dean

480 pages: Newly revised and completely updated


Homeschooling the Teen Years
by Cafi Cohen
A review by Karen Andreola

Homeschooling The Teen Years
Homeschooling: The Teen Years
Cafi Cohen / Random House, Inc / 2000
Homeschooling the Teen Years is a support group in a book. While reading I felt in company with a group of moms who were sharing honestly what has worked or hasn’t worked in their families. 104 families answered the author’s survey. Most follow an eclectic approach—that is, a mix of structure and preference-learning, textbooks and real books, hands-on-learning, field trips, church activities, volunteer work, and some outside classes. Of the 104 surveyed, 100 doubted their ability to successfully homeschool. But they stepped forward. They learned on the job. You can too. You will find just what works for your family. Though not overtly Christian, its pages reflect conservative opinions. Among the shared experiences, chapters include lists of favorite materials for all the major subjects, as well as record keeping advice, and more.
-Karen

Prima
344 pages

Let Us Highly Resolve: Preparing Families to Enter the 21st Century
by David Qunie
ISBN: 0-9656512-0-7
A Review by Dean Andreola

Let Us Highly Resolve
Let Us Highly Resolve
David & Shirley Quine / Cornerstone Curriculum / 1996
Over twenty years of homeschooling their ten children has enabled David and Shirely Quine to developed a knack for quickly getting to the heart of some of our most pressing spiritual and parental concerns. They believe in the necessity of equiping our children to stand against the false ideas of secular culture. How important is it for parents to inspire young minds with truth? It is essential. This book defines the major secular world views and offers a practical Christian response to them. The Quines challenges us to live out the reality of a well defined Christian world view, allowing Christ to live His life through us. They are not alone this in noble endeavor as they librally quote from some of the great Christian thinkers of our age.
Reading this book has reaffirmed my belief that our nation has been lulled to sleep by the enemy — our Christian values have been slowly replaced with the world’s values and shallow sentiments. Let Us Highly Resolve is an intelligent and timely WAKE UP CALL!

-Dean


Mysterious Ways (dvd)
A review by Karen Andreola

Mysterious Ways: It's How God Works
Mysterious Ways: It's How God Works on DVD
Vorlux Entertainment Company / 2002
"This just came in the mail," Dean said, handing me a DVD, "It's a full length movie about a homeschool family."
"Ooh, let's watch it tonight," I suggested. That night, only minutes into the movie, I was drawn in. I sympathized with the mother of the story immediately. Her courage and conviction to remove her son from public school to teach him at home touched me close to the heart. When a threatening, but comical, character from the board of education, knocked at the front door, I was caught up in the suspense. I applauded the father's initiative to be quick-to-act and levelheaded in the crisis that followed.
I greatly appreciate the affirmation I gained upon watching Mysterious Ways. Affirmation helps us all stand firm. You may not learn anything new about homeschooling in this movie but you will be affirmed while you are entertained. No, it isn't a crazy, silly or radical thing to homeschool. It is an exceedingly good thing – even if it does carry us out of our "comfort zone" and take others out of theirs, as well.
Here is a bonus for homeschool students. The director of the film provides an additional twenty-minute narrative on how to write a story and make a good movie on a low budget. This educational feature will teach you and your children something new, after all.
--Karen

Starting Points
by David Quine
A review by Karen Andreola

Starting Points
Starting Points Syllabus: World View Primer Starting Points Syllabus: World View Primer
David Quine / Cornerstone Curriculum / 2002
The hour I peered inside David Quine’s new worldview course was the same hour I was certain I wanted to use it with my daughter Yolanda. It looked wonderful. We already had half the course’s books in our home library and I was happy Mr. Quine had created a syllabus to bring their ideas to light. Starting Points is the syllabus – the main book that pulls together a splendid selection of living books (books alive with ideas.) Starting Points is a thick book with quotes, questions and outlines, and space where the student records his notes, narrations and essays. Mr. Quine has a remarkable way of gently guiding the student into critical thinking. Step by step, the daily assignments ease the student into examining ideas from the standpoint of the Bible — which is so very necessary in this “crooked” generation. Therefore, before you usher in a weightier worldview course I highly recommend using this enjoyable and empowering one to start.
Paul Little’s books ( Know What You Believe, Know Why You Believe) provide an overview of the basic doctrines of historical Christianity. Three stories from the Chronicles of Narnia invite thinking along allegorical lines. The two films, Wizard of Oz and It’s a Wonderful Life provide more symbolism and the examining of the worldviews of the characters and authors. The student goes on to make a comparison of the humanist and Biblical perspective of man’s sin nature with the help of Deadliest Monster and the classic stories, Dr. Jekle and Mr. Hyde and Frankenstein. The Christian foundations of American history round out the course. Upon completion the student receives three credits (Bible, Literature, History).
No answer key is needed. As Yolanda’s teacher I’ve familiarized myself with the books so that when I’ve read over her answers and essays I could see that she has understood the “gist” of it. Those students accustomed to putting what they read in their own words (by Charlotte Mason’s marvelously practical method of narration) will be the most comfortable with Starting Points. Yet students new to this essay-style of writing will be helped by Mr. Quines leading questions. They will apply themselves without feeling overwhelmed. And they will work diligently without tedium.
What joy to hear Yolanda confess, “It is one of the best courses I’ve ever taken.”
Below is a complete list of books used in this course. – Karen.
For Junior High or High School
Starting Points – the workbook/syllabus, 480 pages

Teaching the Trivium: Christian Homeschooling in a Classical Style
by Harvey & Laurie Bluedorn, 637 pages, $27.00
A review by Karen Andreola

Teaching the Trivium
Teaching the Trivium: Christian Homeschooling in a Classical Style
Harvey & Laurie Bluedorn / Trivium Pursuit / 2001
The Bluedorns have a family vision. Their high ideals of teaching by way of the mediaeval model of the trivium require careful study. Yet they make this classical style of education sound so doable, so appealing, even homey. This is because they are pro-homeschool. They believe that “the family is at the heart of God’s plan for restoring Christian culture.” All three stages of the trivium (grammar, logic, and rhetoric) are explained. Then the Bluedorns answer “how-to-do-it” questions they have received over the years, relating their experience with their own children. Their interpretation of classical education shares similarities with the Charlotte Mason philosophy. For instance, good books and narration are essential to both. Although the Bluedorns (who first met in college Greek class) encourage us to make the teaching of Greek and Latin a priority in the elementary grades, they are not, on the whole, advocates for early formal academics. On the contrary, they suggest we delay teaching “formal” math and are in favor of “informal” math and English grammar until the age of ten, which is in keeping with Miss Mason’s advice. If teaching Greek and Latin is not your preference, you won’t want to miss the other riches the Blueborns have to offer. You will glean useful ideas for teaching a range of other subjects to children of all ages.

You Can Teach Your Child Successfully (and 3 other books)
by Dr. Beechick
A review by Karen Andreola

You Can Teach Your Child Successfully
You Can Teach Your Child Successfully
Ruth Beechick / Mott Media, Llc / 1992
“My heart’s desire is to teach my children at home, but I feel inadequate.” Many mothers, according to letters that reach my desk, share a common wish. The wish is to teach their children with confidence. I’ve had the same wish. That’s why (in 1989) I first read this book. Most of us were raised within the public school system. When we compare our tiny homeschools to the grand “system” we begin to doubt ourselves and our educational goals for our children. Common sense fails us because we were steeped in the grand system and the grand system is what we know best. Dr. Beechick believes that parents are the best teachers of their children. A determined mother can, in the loving atmosphere of her home, teach her child successfully. Therefore Dr. Beechick encourages us to relax and trust in our children’s God-given ability to learn. Her friendly approach to teaching is a soothing balm that restores our confidence. She discusses reading comprehension, math skills, the mechanics of writing, and approaches to spelling and grammar in clear and uncluttered prose. Her books bring us the practical help we need. At the same time we are reminded that teaching is the process of passing on knowledge, not passing students through a system.
You Can Teach Your Child Successfully (grade 4-8)
Teaching Preschoolers (age 2&3)
Teaching Kindergartners (age 4&5)
The Three R’s (age 6-up)
 
homeschooling homeschooling
Recommend this
page to a friend.
homeschooling homeschooling

home schooling

Homeschool Highlights provides homeschooling resources for home schooling parents and students. This site is hosted by Dean and Karen Andreola, noted authors who brought to light the works of Charlotte Mason. They also review "living books" and homeschool curriculum materials for Rainbow Resource Center.

Copyright © 2013 Homeschool Highlights. All rights reserved.
Site maintenance by www.nigelandreola.com